The Cloon Reel

The second tune here is a lovely reel which I have heard many times, called The Cloon. No, not The Clone, nor The Clown. You silly reader. It’s also known as The Humors of Toomagh. Say that with a Long Island accent!

I wasn’t able to find much info on it, but so it goes! Enjoy!

 

Pigeon on the Gate

I promised a couple video versions of Pigeon on the gate, so here you have it. This tune is one of the most popular tunes to record, it seems. I have heard quite a few versions. Here are just a few culled from the search results at youtube.

 

…and many more!

A little discussion at THESESSION.ORG.

 

Young Tom Ennis

Here’s a jig called Young Tom Ennis, also known as “The Banshee’s Wail over the Mangle Pit”–a “mangel,” or “mangle” being a word for a type of root vegetable, and the pit referring to a place where they would have been stored over the winter.  Of course, there’s always more than one story behind a tune, so for more see THIS. Thanks to Corey for teaching us this awesome tune.

According to “tunesearch.org:”

YOUNG TOM ENNIS (Tomás Og Magennis/Mac Aengusa). AKA and see “Banshee that Wailed over the Mangle Pit (The),” “Banshee’s Wail Over the Mangle Pit (The).” Irish, Double Jig. A Dorian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. Tom Ennis was indeed the youngest member of Chicago’s Irish Fiddle Club in the early years of the 20th century. A budding piper and fiddler, he was the American-born son of piper and flute player John Ennis of Kildare, from whom O’Neill obtained this tune. When Tom reached maturity he moved to New York where he made a living as a professional piper and founded one of the first Irish-American recording companies, for whom he commercially recorded in the 1910’s and 20’s (Carolan, 1997). Ennis died of a heart attack in Jonesville, Michigan, while on tour.

 

 

 

The Young Irelanders at Hawks and Reed, March 20

The Young Irelanders

If you’re interested in top-notch Irish music, performed by some of the best young musicians that the tradition has to offer, I just found out about a concert that I think would be well worth attending.  On March 20th, at Hawks and Reed Performing Arts Center in Greenfield, MA, The Young Irelanders will perform to the delight of all who attend. I caught this show last year, and it was brilliant.
From the Hawks and Reed event page:

To experience Ireland’s traditions in music, song, and dance presented by some of the most talented young performers in the world, this sensational act is an absolute must-see. The future of Ireland’s culture is undoubtedly in safe hands with The Young Irelanders.

Members of the Irish Cultural Academy have performed across six continents and for many heads of state, Presidents of Ireland, U.S. Presidents, and royalty including Prince Albert of Monaco. Members have also performed in many noted international venues such as Beijing Opera House, Sydney Opera House, Kremlin State Palace in Moscow, the U.S. Capitol Building, The Kennedy Center, and Lincoln Center.

The Young Irelanders are:

Aimee Fitzpatrick – Vocals
Finnian O Connor- Pipes and Whistles
Cillian Mac Cabe- Guitar
Rosie Ferguson- Fiddle
Kevin Murphy- Accordion
Enda Rafferty – Guitar & Vocals
Joe Duffey – Dancer
Ayla Reid – Dancer

Please go to https://hawksandreed.ticketfly.com/event/1640485 for more info and tickets!
A couple of teaser videos to whet your appetite–just what I could find quickly, mind you:
Finnian O’Connor:
Rosie Ferguson:
Joe Duffy:
Venue Information:
Hawks & Reed Performing Arts Center
289 Main St
Greenfield, MA, 01301
https://www.hawksandreed.com/

The West Clare Railway, Revisited

I have blogged about this reel in the past, but I thought it’d be nice to revisit the railway, as I have recently found it departing my fiddle quite a bit lately. I’ve also heard a new version or two of it since then. Also I should note the tune was written by Junior Crehan.

This first is from one of the albums currently in heavy rotation in my collection–great playing here by Joey Abarta (pipes,) Nathan Gourley (fiddle,) and accompanied by Owen Marshall:

A new one to me:

 

Enjoy!

The Crib of Perches

Man, some tunes have the most enigmatic names, but you find out it’s nothing like you thought. The Crib of Perches (or The Creel of Perches) immediately makes me think of a baby’s crib full of dripping, desperate fish gasping for breath. But no. One person commenting on thesession.org page for this tune says,

A fish “crib” is a place in a lake, river, or stream where fish may hang out feeding or resting. It may be a patch of aquatic grasses, a tangle of fallen, submerged tree trunks or roots, or submerged rock formations. A crib is where an angler might have a good chance of catching a meal.

Darn. I like my version better. But then, I’m no good at fishing.

Anyway it’s a lovely tune in the key of D mixolydian, and I highly recommend you take a listen to these few versions I found on the YouTube:

The version that started it all (for me!) From a great album by Nathan Gourley and Laura Feddersen called Life is all Checkered (which is another good tune!)–

I have no idea who this fella is, but he’s a good fiddle and box player, so have a listen:

And finally, a lovely, lively version by fiddler John McEvoy and flute player John Wynne.

 

Hop Jigs

At the LVISS yesterday we learned a tune called “Top the Candle”–a hop jig in D. What IS a hop jig? Good question. Without going to deeply into music theory, I would say that hop jigs are kind of like faster, syncopated slip jigs. It’s kind of like the way slides are like fast jigs with fewer notes. Anyway, there’s definitely a difference in feel between slip jigs and hop jigs. Case in point–The Butterfly is a tune that’s played both ways, and one of our anchors was kind enough to record both versions for us–check it out:

The Butterfly

Here are some examples of hop jigs from YouTube:

For discussions about what hop jigs are, see thesession.org.